A day trip into Abel Tasman National Park

I imagined that the start of our 3 week South Island camping trip was going to be a relatively relaxing 5 night stay at Kaiteriteri lying on the gorgeous beach before the summer hoards arrived – how wrong could I be. There is so much to do in the area that there is no time for relaxing on the beach.

Kaiteriteri is the gateway to the Abel Tasman National Park and home to one of New Zealand’s great walks. While we weren’t quite up for a multi-day hike we did want to explore the Abel Tasman so booked a water taxi ( more like a small ferry ) to take us to Anchorage. You can get dropped off at a multitude of spots and spend the day or the night exploring with the added bonus that the trip on the ferry gives you a chance to see the Abel Tasman National Park from the sea. You can also kayak but your children need to be aged 12 and above and of course its weather dependent.

So after a day’s relaxing and regrouping after our 2 day drive down from Auckland, we were up bright and early and packing a day’s worth of snacks ( there are no shops in Abel Tasman) and boarding the water taxi straight off the beach at Kaiterteri. I always love being out on the water and the trip included a bit of commentary as we passed Split Apple Rock. Marahau, Apple Tree Bay, Adele Island, Watering Bay, Te Pukatea Bay, Pitt Head and Torrent Bay. There is lots to see so it was an enjoyable 45 minute trip to Anchorage where again we got off the water taxi straight on to the beach.

Its pretty amazing to be on a beach all by yourself, well just you and the people who got off the water taxi with you or stayed the night in the hut. As we were there before peak season it was still pretty deserted. We decided to walk the Pitt Head loop over to Te Pukatea Bay which was an easy 45 min hike. Once we got there we were officially on a deserted beach where we were treated to a pod of dolphins passing by.

We then walked about 1 hour in the opposite direction to get to Cleopatras pool, a cascade of water on Torrent River that comes over a waterfall and then down a natural rock shute. Although the day was hot the water was chilly and most of us didn’t get in the water. My son wanted to come down the water chute but needed someone to show him how it was down and it turned out that someone was me. The chute is quite slimy and where the water comes over the waterfall it has worn out the start of the chute into quite a deep pool so you cant put your feet down and basically have to launch yourself into the chilly water. It was fun but slightly rough on your bum and a once only experience for me. I obviously didn’t make it look like that much fun as my son never did give it a go.

We enjoyed the shade of the trees and watching everyone come and go for about an hour before we headed back to Anchorage to meet the last ferry back. The trail to Cleopatras pool has a high and low tide route and the low tide can save you a few kilometres of walking so check the tide before you set out.

We didn’t find it that easy to find the start to the low tide trail and when we did find it (or what we thought was it ) the tide wasn’t quite far enough out so children were piggy backed.

We made it back to Anchorage in plenty of time for the ferry so had time for a quick swim before we jumped on the ferry.

A great way to experience the Abel Tasman National Park if you are short on time or energy.

Our other adventures in the area.

Takaka Adventure

Our South Island itinerary

 

Matakana Shared Path to Point Wells and Omaha

We had wanted to explore the Matakana cycleway (or walkway depending on who you talk to, which website you are looking at and which sign post you are reading) for a while so an Abel Tasman training walk while we were staying in Matakana seemed the perfect opportunity.

We got off to a false start on our first day when we thought we would just walk the first part of it from Matakana and after setting off over the new-ish pedestrian ( and cyclist ) bridge and along the Matakana Community Group Walkway we arrived at a road with no directions and no sign of a path. Long story short the next 3-4 kms of the path is on the road so we decided to regroup and start the trail along Tongue Farm Rd the following day.

After setting off the following day and parking at the Tongue Farm Rd entrance we set off on a relatively easy 7km walk to Point Wells through farmland, with one small section walking on the road. If you are directionally challenged like me be aware that there is little signage so may be print the map to take with you.

If you do the trail in summer try to arrive at Point Wells at high tide as jumping off the jetties there is lots of fun.

I think walking or cycling to Omaha would be longer, however I couldn’t find any accurate distances online and as I said I am directionally challenged.

Yes its also a cycle path, mostly off road and predominately flat with just one steep section up to Takatu Road and down the other side. The trail is quite chunky gravel so probably wouldn’t suit road bikes or less confident riders.

For more information on the Matakana Trail and more information on walks in the area.

 

 

Tips to get you on your bike and exploring NZ

One of the things I have loved about blogging about our adventures is sharing cycling tales with people all around New Zealand and the world. Not only does it inspire me to explore different places but through reading about other peoples adventures I have learned a few things along the way.

One of the mad keen cyclists I have meet it Cycle Coach – Janet Stark and together we have teamed up  to ask some of the cyclists we follow for their favourite tips to get you on your bike and exploring all of the awesome cycling New Zealand has to offer.


Cycle coach

Cycle Coach Janet Stark 

 

Lots of my clients worry that they are not good enough to come on a group ride or are embarrassed by their cycling skills when they attend a coaching session.  It doesn’t matter how good or bad you are.  What counts is your starting point and how you can improve from there.  If you don’t get on your bike and try something new you are never going to find out if you can do it or not –  Just get on your bike and ride and seek help if need be.  Never be embarrassed from trying – be proud of your achievement instead.

www.cyclecoach.co.nz


Paihia MTB bikesJonny Martin from Paihia Mountain Bike Rentals and Shuttles

 

 

Make sure you always carry at least a couple of tools, a chain breaker and a pump – even just a basic multi-tool (and know how to use it).  Sounds like a broken record but you might carry it around for 1 year and never use it, but the day you need it- you will be glad you did. Oh, and always have fun!

paihiamountainbikes.co.nz


nduro events

Belinda from Nduro Events Rotorua

 

 

When going downhill, remember heels down and elbows bent, look aggressive but safely get down the decent. Heels down should prevent you from tipping over the handle bars.

http://nduro.co.nz/index.html


Ben from 3xploren3xplorenzz

 

 

Vision: one of the biggest things about driving any form of vehicle is vision and this does not differ to cycling. Look ahead, let your peripheral vision fill in the blanks and ride to your line. Force yourself to never look at your handlebars and look ahead.

Ride under lights: One of the biggest improvements you can make to your riding reiterating the above is to ride off-road under lights at night. This will hone your trail skills, lines, and amazingly your balance. Your mind then, naturally, has less information to distract you.

Be flexible: Strangely this can be taken both physically and metaphorically. Stretching and doing core strength exercises will help you massively on any ride and allow you to control the bike more freely and relaxed. Metaphorically be flexible with where, how and what you ride, change is good!

3xplorenz.com


cranksistasJulia Founder of Cranksistas & Ambassador for FourForty MTB Park & LIV Giant

 

 

Always make sure someone knows where you’re going and make sure your cellphone is fully charged before you go. You never when you might need to call someone, or you’re out a bit later than you planned and you need the torch on your phone

https://www.facebook.com/CrankSistas/


CyclinginNZ

Cycling in New Zealand

 

Cycling in New Zealand is an amazing way to see the country. It’s slower than by car, but faster than walking! It gets you to beautiful remote places with stunning nature and wildlife. But always check out the grade of the trails. For example on the website of NZ Cycle Trail. Or on the trail websites. The grades go from very easy to expert. Beware! Sometimes a trail consists of different grades.

For example the Motu Trails. You start with an easy, flat 10 km ride on the Dunes Trail (Grade 2), the next 67 km on the Motu Road Trail is Grade 3 (intermediate), and the last part on the Pakihi Track is only for advanced mountain bikers. So read the description of the trails carefully, and make sure everybody in your group is capable to ride the particular trail. It makes it so much more fun!

Tip: you don’t have to cycle the whole trail. Pick the part which matches your skills and arrange a pick up by one of the many tour operators on the New Zealand Cycle Trails.

Happy riding!

cyclinginnewzealand.com


Riding flowNadia from Riding Flow Rotorua

 

Bring out your inner child and play on your bike.  Try rolling over curbs, roots and logs and getting either or both wheels off the ground (on purpose!).  Zooming down trails with manic grins is a status to be proud of no matter what age!

riding-flow-mountain-bike-guiding


Team benter
Bennett and Slater – Travel writers and NZ Cycle Trail Instagrammers
The popularity of mountain biking and off-road cycling in New Zealand has exploded in recent years. The result of this is that, not only are there cycle trials and paths all over the country, there is an increasing amount of bike hire and bike tours in the right places too.
The best way to tap into these rides – be they urban explorations or cross-country trails taking in attractions like wineries and country cafes – is to head to the nearest i-SITE visitor centre. Most towns and cities now have decent cycling/walking maps and i-SITE staff can give you advice on the right ride for you, and tell you where to hire a bike.
The Nga Haerenga New Zealand Cycle Trail is a great way to explore particularly scenic parts of New Zealand, with 22 official rides, ranging from super-easy, half-day rides to advanced, multi-day bike-packing adventures. The official website NZ Cycle trails gives you info on what to expect, while individual trail websites provide more details.
Anyone wishing to really dig down into New Zealand mountain biking should pick up a copy of the Kennett Brothers’ Classic New Zealand Mountain Bike Rides – an indispensable guide.
Other great resources include the Tourism New Zealand website and Single Tracks.

Brett Thom – ebike commuter Auckland

Commuting with an electric bike – it’s a cross between cycling and motorcycling except unlike a motorbike you’re silent, which means you are more vulnerable to not being seen. You can be on top of someone faster on an electric bike which, if it’s like mine, can do 40kph without too much effort, means you have to factor this in when riding.

Space, distance from anything that moves is much more important at 40kph compared to 25-30kph. Lane splitting is often safer on a fast-electric bike than, safer than using the bike lane when the traffic is stationary or near too it, it removes or greatly lessens the likelihood of having a car pull into or out of a driveway which happens all the time.


 

 

 

Exploring the Hawkes Bay

We started our Hawkes Bay tour on the day after Cyclone Cook passed through. We had planned our road trip 4 months earlier and weren’t going to let a Cyclone get in the way. Strangely enough the planning started in the back of the car in the rain when we were supposed to be sitting on the beach. In hindsight we maybe should have checked the roads were open and campgrounds were fully operational before we headed off but we were a bit excited about getting on the road.

It was fun exploring some new territory on the way to Napier, lucky it was fun as it was quite a long drive but the sun was shining after the storm and the scenery was stunning on the Napier Taupo highway.

As we drove into Napier we were detoured round a back road as a tree had fallen across the road and that’s when we realised that although Auckland had dodged the storm some parts of the country had still been hammered by strong winds and we had just driven into one of them.

After setting up the camper we decided to make the most of the Hawkes Bay sunshine and jumped on our bikes to explore the cycle trail along the waterfront that started right from our campground. The after effects of the storm made for an impressive swell crashing onto the beach which only added to the stunning views as we rode along the waterfront. A lovely flat trail and mesmerising views meant it was hard to turn around but as the sun sunk low in the sky we headed for home, well the camper.

The next day we planned to hit the Eskdale Mountain Bike Park. A tourist in the campground saw us in our bike gear and asked where we were off to and when we told him he said that the Mountain Bike Park had been pretty hard hit by the storm with lots of trees down. Undeterred and forever in denial we headed out anyhow. We probably only got 5 minutes ride into the forest before the path was blocked by fallen trees, and I don’t mean one tree lying across the path more of a stack of trees making the path impassable. Still undeterred we started carrying our bikes straight up the hill over and around all the obstacles. We met a local coming back down, chatted to him for a bit and then he grabbed one of our kids bikes and started carrying it up the hill for us.

Turns out he was part of the Club committee and seemed to take everyones enjoyment of the Mountain Bike Park very seriously so he gave us the inside word on what tracks could be ridden after the storm. Not many were unfortunately but we still had a great time ‘sessioning’ ( his word not mine ) a few of the trails and after a couple of hours riding we decided to head back to the carpark a different way, only to be meet by more broken trees.

After a quick lunch at the campground we headed out to explore Napier on a sunny afternoon and took in the beach at Ahuriri, then wound our way up Bluff Hill and watched the workings of the port below as the sun set. We then wandered along the Napier town centres waterfront gardens and experienced the big waves crashing onto the new pier.

The next day dawned sunny and clear which made for great views from the top of Te Mata Peak. You could drive all the way up but we decided to park half way and walk up which took about half an hour ( maybe more as we got distracted by the views ) along sheep tracks. As we walked back down my son spotted mountain bikers so decided he wanted to come back and check out the trails the next day. We had planned to ride some of the cycle trails but figured we had all day and we love riding so why not ride two places in one day.

So the next morning we headed back to Te Mata Peak for our ride. Its fair to say these rides would have been more enjoyable if they hadn’t been hit by a storm a few days earlier and as they were on the side of a mountain they were quite steep and muddy. After Te Mata it was back across town to ride the Puketapu Loop, part of the Hawkes Bay Cycle trails. These trails cover most of the Hawkes Bay in different sections that can be ridden separately or all together. We did a loop from Otatara Pa to the Puketapu pub and back again. It was easy riding along the riverbank with the bonus of a pub lunch but if wineries are more your style there are rides that include them as well, in fact there is a trail called the Wineries trail.

All in all we loved the Hawkes Bay and the East Cape adventures didn’t stop there…next stop Tolaga Bay!!

Road tripping with kids

B.C ( before children ) I loved road tripping with my then boyfriend ( now husband ). We would throw ourselves in the car with reckless abandon with some drinks, a bag of chips and a mix tape and go explore. Fast forward a few years and two kids and the packing takes a while longer, the snacks are more extensive and the mix tape is an audio book. Oh my how times have changed.

Over the years we have explored extensively with our kids including almost monthly trips to Rotorua ( a 3 hour trip that can be up to 4 hours depending on traffic ) and 3 weeks round the South Island and for the most part our kids are good at sitting in the car. In fact, we just drove 5 hours to Napier and actually described the trip as enjoyable and yes the kids were in the car with us.

Like any part of adventuring and exploring with kids it takes training and that starts when they are young. So no matter how young your kids they are always ready to discover the joys of roadtripping. To make sure it’s a pleasant experience for everyone I have put together my top tips for road tripping with littlies and not so littlies;

  1. If your kids are still having a nap during the day then this is a great time to travel, or travel in the evening.
  2. Pack lots of little snacks and water. Nothing seems to make children as hungry as sitting in the car.
  3. While we are on food – always have a container ready for food that comes up as quickly as it goes down. I have a container in the front of the car with ‘car essentials’ in; wipes, hand sanitiser, sun screen and the second a kid mentions feeling queasy I up-end that container and hand it over.
  4. Old MacDonald had a farm can have a lot of choruses when you have some miles to cover. And kids are never too old to sing – it’s just the songs that change as they grow up and we can pass many a happy mile singing along with the radio.
  5. Play games: With slightly older children I spy is always a winner as is I went to the moon and I took ( if you aren’t familiar with I went this game – go round the car with each person taking something to the moon in alphabetical order and remembering all the things before them). Good for the parent’s grey matter as well.
  6. Let the kids take a few toys in the car. My children always take their soft toys and can happily pass the time play acting with the toys.
  7. Tell stories. Often as we are travelling somewhere with the kids, my husband and I will have already been there ( albeit in another life time ) but it’s fun to relieve the memories and the kids really like hearing that we had a life before they came along. Even if its somewhere we go all the time ( like Rotorua ) we can tell many a story about all the different friends who have come away with us or the different mountain bike rides we have done.
  8. If you get worn out telling stories then of course you can leave the story telling to the professionals and pick up some audio books ( from the library or you can download ). Of course for young children the Ear drops audio books are great as not only is it passing the time its educational.
  9. Some people say lots of frequent stops for kids but we always tried to drive for 2-3 hours before stopping and it has got our kids used to sitting in the car. Now they are older, toilet stops aside we can drive for 3 hours easily with no stops.
  10. And yes there is always a screen that could entertain your child but then they would be missing all the amazing sights out the window. As a last resort we use some screen time but I really think we are doing our children a favour in the long term by teaching them to sit quietly, be mindful and enjoy the world around them.

We live in an amazing country, just made for road trips. With a bit of planning you can enjoy the journey with your kids.

Now you have the road tripping sorted are you ready to start exploring and adventuring with your kids. Check out some of our adventures;

Sharing family fun & adventures from the kitchen to the great outdoors