Exploring Abel Tasman, Kaiteriteri,South Island, New Zealand

A day trip into Abel Tasman National Park

I imagined that the start of our 3 week South Island camping trip was going to be a relatively relaxing 5 night stay at Kaiteriteri lying on the gorgeous beach before the summer hoards arrived – how wrong could I be. There is so much to do in the area that there is no time for relaxing on the beach.

Kaiteriteri is the gateway to the Abel Tasman National Park and home to one of New Zealand’s great walks. While we weren’t quite up for a multi-day hike we did want to explore the Abel Tasman so booked a water taxi ( more like a small ferry ) to take us to Anchorage. You can get dropped off at a multitude of spots and spend the day or the night exploring with the added bonus that the trip on the ferry gives you a chance to see the Abel Tasman National Park from the sea. You can also kayak but your children need to be aged 12 and above and of course its weather dependent.

So after a day’s relaxing and regrouping after our 2 day drive down from Auckland, we were up bright and early and packing a day’s worth of snacks ( there are no shops in Abel Tasman) and boarding the water taxi straight off the beach at Kaiterteri. I always love being out on the water and the trip included a bit of commentary as we passed Split Apple Rock. Marahau, Apple Tree Bay, Adele Island, Watering Bay, Te Pukatea Bay, Pitt Head and Torrent Bay. There is lots to see so it was an enjoyable 45 minute trip to Anchorage where again we got off the water taxi straight on to the beach.

Its pretty amazing to be on a beach all by yourself, well just you and the people who got off the water taxi with you or stayed the night in the hut. As we were there before peak season it was still pretty deserted. We decided to walk the Pitt Head loop over to Te Pukatea Bay which was an easy 45 min hike. Once we got there we were officially on a deserted beach where we were treated to a pod of dolphins passing by.

We then walked about 2 hours in the opposite direction to get to Cleopatras pool, a cascade of water on Torrent River that comes over a waterfall and then down a natural rock shute. Although the day was hot the water was chilly and most of us didn’t get in the water. My son wanted to come down the water chute but needed someone to show him how it was down and it turned out that someone was me. The chute is quite slimy and where the water comes over the waterfall it has worn out the start of the chute into quite a deep pool so you cant put your feet down and basically have to launch yourself into the chilly water. It was fun but slightly rough on your bum and a once only experience for me. I obviously didn’t make it look like that much fun as my son never did give it a go.

We enjoyed the shade of the trees and watching everyone come and go for about an hour before we headed back to Anchorage to meet the last ferry back. The trail to Cleopatras pool has a high and low tide route and the low tide can save you a few kilometres of walking so check the tide before you set out.

We didn’t find it that easy to find the start to the low tide trail and when we did find it (or what we thought was it ) the tide wasn’t quite far enough out so children were piggy backed.

We made it back to Anchorage in plenty of time for the ferry so had time for a quick swim before we jumped on the ferry.

A great way to experience the Abel Tasman National Park if you are short on time or energy.

P.S. All times given for walking are how long it took us with a 7 and 11 year old. For actual times have a look at Department of Conservation.

Or talk to any of the people at the water taxi companies – they are super knowledgeable about the area.

Our other adventures in the area:

Takaka Adventure

Our South Island itinerary

The Tasman region

 

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